Pre-matured end of life (for products)

Apple Watch 4: Written off in just a year

Apple will be rolling out a new generation of its smartwatch tomorrow (September 20). It’s an annual introduction for the Cupertino-based company, along with a slew of other computers and devices. This is what keeps technology companies innovating and in business.

But, what shocked me was that the one-year-old Apple Watch 4 is being discontinued. While Apple must have its reasons for doing so, spare a thought for those fans who spent hard-earned cash on the Apple Watch 4.

Is this the company’s tactic to compel them to upgrade to the latest version? If that’s the case, why is it still selling the older Apple Watch 3?

I’ve had my fair share of buying new products that became obsolete in a year of so. The most painful was my first notebook computer which cost more than S$2,000 in the mid-1990s. That’s a lot of money back then.

Shortly after I bought the new notebook, I discovered that the US manufacturer had discontinued that product. Upset is too mild a word to describe my feelings at that time. What’s worse was that half the screen went blank one day and the customer support told me that it would cost $800 to get the screen replaced.

After much angst and deliberation, I decided to buy a new laptop from another vendor. That US-branded notebook turned out to be my first and last from the company.

A more recent experience was my Pebble Time smartwatch in April 2016. In December that year, Pebble announced that it would be shut down, and no longer make or support for any device or honour any warranties.

Two experiences. Twenty years apart. Both times, the feeling was similar — painful!

Tech companies should care more for their customers. Beyond the bells and whistles associated with big fanfare launches, they must show customers that they are committed to supporting the products — at least for a few years after they stop selling it.

Otherwise, customers are the ones to bear the brunt and pay the cost for believing in the wrong product from the wrong vendor.

If vendors are not careful, they risk losing customer trust. Once lost, that’s hard to regain, especially when there are so many other options available.

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